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The Queensland Government has released the Wet Tropics Water Resource Plan, a water management plan intended to provide water users in the Wet Tropics region of Far North Queensland with a clear framework for the productive and responsible use of water for commercial, residential and future development while protecting the environment.

“The plan is a common sense approach to management, providing transparency for water users in the way they manage their water and associated business operations,” Mr Cripps said.

“It will provide for continued use of existing amounts of water, provide a framework for dealing with seasonal adjustments in stream flow and a process for releasing unallocated water.

“Water entitlements will also be able to be traded between water users, allowing for the most efficient and productive use of resources and opportunities for industry to grow.

“This plan was developed in full consultation with rural and industry groups and I thank them for their cooperation and support.”

Mr Cripps said the new plan included area to volume conversion rates, outlined the unallocated water release process, delivered additional town water reserves to councils and provided access to water for low risk activities.

“Unallocated surface water totalling 41,100 megaltires per annum will remain for Indigenous and strategic use by the state,” he said.

“The Newman Government is also allowing for greater opportunities to access water, with water reserves being made available for use by industry.

“For example, 16,350 megalitres of water from the general reserve and 870,000 megalitres from the high flow reserve, will be made available for general use, such as irrigation.”

Further details of the Wet Tropics WRP are available from https://www.dnrm.qld.gov.au/water/catchments-planning/catchments/wet-tropics.

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